Introducing Author Winslow Eliot

Posted on June 3, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews, Book Reviews, L.Leander Book Reviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Winslow EliotIt’s my great pleasure to introduce author Winslow Eliot this week.  I stumbled across this author’s site as I was doing research and  I was very interested in what she offers.   Ms. Eliot runs a series of workshops for writers called WriteSpa-An Oasis for Writers: Writing Through the Year based on faith and daily exercises.  I joined and have thoroughly enjoyed the process.  Immediately I contacted Ms. Eliot and asked if she would like to be featured on this blog and she agreed.  I’m glad I could interview her and share her work with my readers.  If you’d like to read my review of her book The Happiness Cure click here.  Please leave a comment and let us know you visited!

Interview with Winslow Eliot

by L.Leander

What is the favorite character you have written and why? Probably Tess HeavenFallsCoverDuncan – she was my heroine in Heaven Falls. I just loved how she entered into an entirely new situation with such grace and humor, and I found her as lovable and interesting as the hero did!

Are you self-published or traditionally published and why? I’ve been published traditionally (NAL/Signet and St. Martin’s Press) in the past, but since 2010 I’ve been self-published. I MUCH prefer the freedom, adventure, thrill of investing in my creative projects. I love owning 100% of my work, and receiving 100% of my profits. In addition to being able to thoroughly enjoy writing my stories the way I want to, I also love the covers that my designers have created.

What did you want to be when you grew up?  Did you realize that dream? I always wanted to be a writer. Even before I knew how to write I’d fill up notebooks with arcane scribbles, pretending that I was writing a book. So, yes, writing has been my dream, and I HAVE realized it. Dreams do continue, though, so it’s not over… there’s always more to realize within the dream of writing. We’ll see what unfolds.

Explain your creative process.  Pantser?  Outliner? Hmm. It’s hard to say. A story sweeps me away, scenes sweep me away, and I follow my beloved characters through those events. My stories are very twisty-turny, unexpected, so once the first draft is completed I do find I spend many months—sometimes years—making sure that all the twists, turns, and unexpected surprises are 100% explained and tied up by the end.

How do you come up with ideas for your writing projects? That’s just one of those things. They pour out—I can’t really keep up with them, because I do like to take my time with my stories.

Who is your biggest supporter?  Why? I’d have to say my mother has always been my biggest supporter. She was a fantastic editor of every single one of my first drafts of every book I wrote. She was one of the most enthusiastic fans. She admired my talent, my determination, my courage in pursuing my dream. She died recently and I sometimes don’t know how I’ll write and get my next book to press without her editorial skills and her unstinting encouragement.

Explain a day in the life of a writer (you). I wake up around six a.m. and lean over the edge of my bed, pick up and turn on my laptop, and begin to write. I start with writing down my dreams and some other things, and then always write my “daily happinesses” which I then share on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, etc. During this time, my handsome husband has brought me coffee in bed, without interrupting my flow. Once my happinesses are posted, I check mail, but unless it’s really important I don’t respond until later in the morning. I devote the rest of the morning to working on my writing project—whichever book is currently absorbing me. In the afternoon, we’ll walk, or I’ll do yoga, answer emails, or indulge in various other hobbies I have: like meditative sufi dance and tarot. Then in the evening I’ll join my husband for a glass of wine and some light entertainment—currently our favorite is watching old Perry Mason mysteries. I do teach high school students twice a week during the school year, and have other things I do. But basically that’s my ideal “day in the life.”

What is your wildest dream for your writing? To be a beloved household name—and the income to show for it LOL.

What types of books do you like to read/authors that have inspired you? So many! I love the classics like Jane Austen; love Graham Greene and Anne Douglas Sedwick. Contemporary novelists…I just read Karen Engelmann’s The Stockholm Octavo which is fabulous. I also recently discovered Robert MacLean, who’s a sort of modern-day P.G.Wodehouse. I love an author (like him) who can make me laugh out loud. Most of all I love my grandmother’s books. Her grown-up novels are all out of print, but they definitely inspired me growing up. Her name is Ethel Cook Eliot.
belly dancing 2
What is your favorite hobby?  Does it enhance your writing? As I mentioned earlier, I love dancing. I used to do a lot of belly dancing, and that has morphed into a sufi dance meditation practice. I also enjoy using the tarot—those cards are like my friends. We sit around telling each other stories! Also, I sing and play guitar, and we have friends who come over and play with us on occasion. My husband is a musician too. Yes, I think singing and dancing definitely enhances my writing! It keeps me light-hearted. I can get much too serious otherwise.

Happiness-cover-ebookSHORT AUTHOR BIO: Winslow Eliot is the award-winning author of the novels Heaven Falls, Bright Face of Danger, A Perfect Gem, and Pursued, as well as the inspirational books: What Would You Do If There Was Nothing You Had To Do and WriteSpa-An Oasis for Writers: Writing Through the Year. Every morning she writes and shares her daily happinesses before turning to her work of the day: writing more books and mentoring writers.

LINKS:

Author site: http://winsloweliot.com/

The Happiness Cure on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/The-Happiness-Cure-ebook/dp/B00CGMJZWY/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1366637415&sr=8-10&keywords=the+happiness+cure

Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/winsloweliot.author?ref=hl

On Twitter: https://twitter.com/winsloweliot

On Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winslow_Eliot

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Introducing Author Michael Murphy

Posted on May 6, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews, Book Reviews, L.Leander Book Reviews, L.Leander Reviews and Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

005 What a treat we have in store for us this week.  My guest is Michael Murphy, author of Goodbye Emily.  This is a sometimes nostalgic, sometimes sad and downright funny book about returning to Woodstock and reliving the days of youth.  If you’d like to read my review click here.

Interview with Michael Murphy

By L.Leander

Where do you write?  What’s your creative space like?  

I used to write glued to my home office computer, but in the past year I’ve added a wireless keyboard to my tablet and now write in the backyard with my chickens, Michael bonds with the girls 005around the pool or patio. Freedom via technology!

What is your favorite writing tool?

As I mentioned, my tablet is a fabulous tool. In addition to writing, I can pause and check something on the internet and since my current work in process is historical fiction, that comes in handy when checking slang words in the 1930s for example.

What movie star would you pick as one of the characters in your book and why? I’ve been asked this more for my return to Woodstock novel, Goodbye Emily, than any of my previous books. I think it’s because readers often comment that it would make a great movie. Since it focuses on three baby boomers reliving their roadtrip to Woodstock, I envision Tom Hanks as Sparky, Billy Bob Thornton or Sam Elliott as Buck and William H. Macy as Josh.

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What did you want to be when you grew up?

I always wanted to be an author. I read Gone with the Wind when I was nine. I was a geek even then, still am.

Did you realize that dream?

Just about.

Explain your creative process.  Pantser?  Outliner?

I’ve always been a seat of the pants author, but I’ve become more formalized as I’ve become more experienced. For example. I write details biographical histories for my main characters so I know how they’ll act or what they might say in a given situation or scene.

If you could only have one mode of transportation what would it be, a horse or a bicycle?  Why?

I’m not much for either, but my wife and I have a tandem bike that we dust off now and then. She still looks sweet, upon the seat of a bicycle built for two.

Do you dream about your stories?

Absolutely. Ever written about a dream? Dreaming is the most important part of my creative process. I use it as a tool. If I envision a character or scene before falling asleep, I often wake up with a vivid dream. I also tap into my subconscious on a treadmill.

What’s your favorite theme park?

Definitely Disneyland.

Why?

It’s the happiest place on earth!

Are you a reader?  I’m an avid reader.

I write the type of books I love reading, mostly (but not limited to) mystery/suspense with a lot of humor. The master being Nelson DeMille.

Michael says:

My goal in writing Goodbye Emily was to portray sixty-somethings in a realistic manner instead of “get off my lawn” clichés. By realistic, I mean, funny, talented, sexually active and optimistic about the future. From the reviews so far, I think I’ve succeeded.

IMG_0http://www.amazon.com/Goodbye-Emily-ebook/dp/B00A8IYL2C

www.mjmurphy.com

www.goodbyeemily.com

http://blog.mjmurphy.com/

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Introducing Author Roy Murry

Posted on April 8, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews, L.Leander Reviews and Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Roy MurryI’ve been waiting to do this interview for a while now and I’m very excited to present to you an author who has written perhaps one of the most interesting tales I’ve ever read.  The Audubon Caper is a work of fiction based on actual events and the story starts at rapid speed and escalates from there.  If you’d like to read my review of the book click here.  No matter what type of material you read you’ll definitely be amazed at the idea that this is a true story and  happened in the USA.  Without going into too much detail I’ll just tell you this is definitely one of my favorite books and if you haven’t already indulged you should run right out and buy a copy.  You definitely will not be disappointed.

Interview of Author Roy Murry

by L.Leander

Where do you write?  What’s your creative space like?

A quiet room anywhere I can plug in my Laptop.  I need a place with no distractions.

What is your favorite writing tool?

#1 Tool: My Brain. A good night’s sleep with no appointments in the morning is very important to me before I write.  I place an outline in my mind the night before I write and fill in the blanks when I start writing around 4:00 a.m. in the morning.  Other than my mind, I have three books near by The World Almanac, The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, and their Thesaurus.

What movies star would you pick as one of the characters in your book and why?

I have never thought of my book as movie material.  Any young actor in their late twenties would do fine.  I think any good actor could pull off the main character’s traits.

What did you want to be when you grew up?  Did you realize that dream?

Well, I didn’t dream of being a writer.  I got drafted into the US Army, before I could decide what I wanted to be.  As a Green Beret in Vietnam, I felt like I reached a goal R. Murry circa 1970very few could achieve and live to tell about it.

When I returned home from the war, I reached another goal, not a dream, of graduating from college where my America Literature professor told me I could write after grading my assigned assessments of great and not so great American Writers.  At that point, I thought, not dreamt, I will be a writer someday.

Explain your creative process.

I outline with sentences what I will write.  After that, I put my mind to work at each step.  Sleep on it and write.  I do this with the reviews I write for my blog.

One or two sentences, while reading a book, and then put my brain to work. Then I write.  Might sound too easy, but it works for me.  If I’m not happy with the first draft, I repeat process again, again, and again if need be.

If you could only have one mode of transportation, what would it be a horse or a bicycle?

Neither.     I’m a walker.  Therefore, I’d rather walk, thank you.

Do you dream about your stories?

I don’t call it dreaming.  As I said, I put my brain to work.  That’s why I have one.

What were you like in high school?

I was an introvert until I got to know you.  Then I became an extrovert.  With friends and family, I was fun to be with.  But if they screwed with my reading time, they knew they were in trouble.

What’s your favorite theme park?  Why?

Disney World and Epcot Center, Orlando, Florida.  The main reason was to see the happy faces on my children.  That was years ago.  In a few years, I’ll take my grandchildren.  For me, I liked adventure land and the restaurants at Epcot.   Traveling is a theme park for me.  I do all the itineraries, etc.

Are you a reader?  What types of books do you like best?  What author(s)?

Read?!  That’s all I do.  Read, write, and play golf is my life.

Past: Ralph Waldo Emerson; Henry David Thoreau, et al

Near past: Edgar Allen Poe; Arthur Conan Doyle, et al

Present: Dan Brown; James Patterson, et al

For my blog: #children to #erotica, and all in between

I like mysteries.   Who-done-it’s I love to solve before the end of the book.  Since

starting my blog  http://www.conniesbrother.blogspot.com,

my reading has been eclectic.

Links:

My book – The Audubon Capertac

Amazon: http://amzn.to/MGxfR7

Barnes & Noble: http://bit.ly/PWnA8n

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/roy.murry.7 

Twitter: @roylmurry425

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Introducing Author David D’Aguanno

Posted on April 3, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews, L.Leander Reviews and Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SAMSUNGIf you love a comedic, witty mystery you’ll love this week’s author, David D’Aguanno.  You may know him best for his Brett character in Don’t Mess With Brett but do you know he has also penned a book that is very different and serious titled Why She Left Us?  I think you’ll enjoy learning about this writer and you’ll be glad you took the time to follow his interview. Be sure to leave a comment for a chance to win a free digital copy of Don’t Mess With Brett.  If you’d like to see my review of Brett Aerobicizes, the second book in the series, click here.

Interview with Author David D’Aguanno

by L.Leander

What is your favorite pastime (other than writing)? (you can only pick one) and why?

When I’m not writing (or reading), I’m usually listening to classical music. I have a huge CD collection, and because there are only so many hours in the day, there are many CDs I’ve heard only once and don’t even remember what they sound like!

Who are you as a writer?

As a writer – and particularly as a writer of the Brett Cornell series of comedy-mysteries – I view my role to be that of a person whose aim is merely to entertain. In other words, I sincerely doubt that anyone would want to read a “Brett book” in order to gain any kind of spiritual enlightenment. Escapism, a few laughs – That’s about it!

What are your thoughts on the Indie Publishing movement?

I think it’s wonderful, since it gives so many tremendously talented writers an opportunity to have their works read, instead of having to spend so much valuable time, simply trying to find an agent and/or a publisher in such a competitive area.

Have you ever ghostwritten?  Would you?  Why?

No, I haven’t, and I probably wouldn’t. As it is, I have so many various ideas floating around in my head that I need to get “on paper” that I probably wouldn’t have the time for it.

What is your favorite book of all time?  Why? 

Well, I probably have several favorites,  but one that stands out in my mind is “Sir Harry Hotspur of Humblethwaite” by Anthony Trollope. I recall how, when reading it, I said to myself,” I know where this story is heading,” only to find myself completely surprised by a tragic ending that left me emotionally devastated. Often, in a single phrase or a single sentence, Trollope was able to pull me into the minds and emotional states of his main characters. Amazing!

Do you believe writers need a degree to be successful?  Why or why not?

Having taught English in a public school for nearly 30 years, I find myself being somewhat finicky about spelling, punctuation, and the like. However, with a good editor and proper guidance, anyone should be able to produce a worthwhile piece of writing, even without having earned a degree.

You are camping in a tent in the woods.  A loud roar happens outside the flap to the tent.  What do you do?

Seeing as the mere suspicion that a spider or a snake may be nearby usually gets me nerved up, my imagination would go into over-drive at the sound of a loud roar, and I’d probably freak out completely!

What is your greatest asset?  Why?

My greatest asset as a person? Well, I’ve been told that I’m extremely compassionate, or “an old softie” (if you will). As a writer, I think that I have a knack for coming up with a story that moves along fairly quickly, for the most part.

What do you treasure most on earth?

It may sound like a stock answer, but I’d have to say: “My friends and family.”

What did you like to do as a child?  Favorite games, pastimes, friends, etc.

Being non-athletic as a child, I enjoyed mostly board games and word games, and my love of classical music, even at any early age, meant that listening to records or music on the radio took up a lot of my time. Oh, and writing little stories, too, of course.

What is the single-most important thing that has happened to you thus-far on your writing journey?

Finding out that there are so many ways of reaching potential readers with my writing has been an eye-opening experience for me.

How important is being successful as a writer to you?

Being successful as a writer is probably as important to me now as being successful as a teacher was, back in the days when I was doing that, assuming that “being successful” means being able to affect other people’s moods, attitudes, and lives in a positive way.

The genie is going to grant you three wishes.  What are they?

O.K., if I were to say that I’d wish I could feed all the hungry people in the world – or anything else along that line – I’d be lying. So, at the risk of sounding self-centered, I’d wish (1) that my Brett books could be turned into a TV series, preferably on HBO, Showtime, or Starz (I’m not too fussy, am I?),  (2) that my other novel “Why She Left Us” could be turned into a major motion picture, and (3) that I could live long enough to hear Brett’s quirky sayings become part of people’s everyday vocabulary. (You would have had to have read one of my Brett books in order to fully appreciate what I mean by that last “wish” of mine.)

You get one day to spend any way you want with whomever you want.  Describe the day (money is no object)

Wow! I’m afraid I can’t really answer that, only because I’d want to be able to spend the day with people I miss the most, and sadly enough, it would be physically impossible to do that (you can guess the reason why).

Who or what were your main inspirations for choosing a writing career?

A lot of my writing was originally done several years back, and it wasn’t until my cousin Darlene urged me to do something with the novels I had written that I actually decided to take on this so-called second career of mine. Without her show of confidence in my writing ability, I probably would be doing something else right now. Sad but true, now that I think about it.

Here’s a little more about books currently available from David D’Aguanno in his own words.

A little bit about my books:

Brett Cornell is meant to be taken more as a cartoonish type of character rather than a real person. In fact, if such a person really did exist, most people wouldn’t have anything to do with him, and any self-respecting woman would surely stay clear of him, despite his good looks. The novels themselves are over-the-top and tongue-in-cheek, so that anyone expecting a serious and intricately plotted murder mystery (as in Hercule Poirot or Sherlock Holmes, for example) would be very disappointed. Provided you don’t take the character of Brett Cornell too seriously, though, you should probably find the novels engaging and amusing and totally unique.

My novel “Why She Left Us” is radically different, written in a somewhat experimental style, and involving characters who are meant to be viewed as real human beings who have sincere and deep emotions and several of whom suffer greatly through acts of betrayal, loss, and revenge. If I can move readers emotionally in this novel, then I will have succeeded in doing what I meant to do in writing this novel.

Here are some links to check out this author and his books.  Be sure to leave a comment below to enter the drawing for a free digital copy of Don’t Mess With Brett by David D’Aguanno.

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Introducing Author JT Sather

Posted on March 27, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews, L.Leander Reviews and Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

7685942This week it’s my pleasure to share a writer with you who is very unique.  While many of us whine and moan when the bottom drops out of our lives, this author used a very different tactic.  I think JT Sather has had just about everything happen that can go wrong but he chose to face adversity with humor and optimism.  We’ve had a couple of good chats about my home state of Michigan and its beautiful upper peninsula, as well!  So, without further ado, let me introduce JT Sather and his book How to Survive When the Bottom Drops Out.  You can read my review of the book here.

Interview with JT Sather

by L.Leander

What is your favorite pastime (other than writing)? (you can only pick one) and why?

I love to build sandcastles, or at least my version of sandcastles.  Time on the beach is very relaxing for me.  I like to find a secluded spot so I can work undisturbed.  It takes anywhere from two to four hours to make a masterpiece, and it’s tough when there’s a bunch of kiddies running about.

Who are you as a writer?

I’m the same man that I am in regular life.  What I write about is non-fiction.  I don’t have to immerse myself into a fantasy world, my reality is crazy enough!

What are your thoughts on the Indie Publishing movement?

I think much of it’s terribly disorganized.  I’m happy to be a part of it, but I wish someone would have held my hand when I started.  When I first published, the book was terribly riddled with spelling mistakes.  When I finally realized this (two months later) I felt awful.  If people are going to pay their hard-earned money for a product, I want it to be quality.  Thankfully I have a publisher now, and it’s been edited by a professional.

Have you ever ghostwritten?  Would you?  Why?

I have been approached to ghost write a memoir for a friend of mine.  I’m happy to do it, but it’s very slow go.  He’s 2000 miles away from me, and he’s a very busy guy.  It’s difficult to pin him down to answer the many questions I have for him.

What is your favorite book of all time?  Why? 

I’ve only read a handful in my life.  One that stuck in my head was Fear and Loathing. I really enjoyed Hunter’s story telling skills.

Do you believe writers need a degree to be successful?  Why or why not?

A degree? Absolutely not.  What they need to possess is story telling skills.  Everyone has an imagination, but it takes a skill to transfer it to paper.

You are camping in a tent in the woods.  A loud roar happens outside the flap to the tent.  What do you do?

I would scream like a ten year old girl, they hate that!

What is your greatest asset?  Why?

I’d have to say my experience.  I’ve been through more than most,  and the lessons that I’ve learned have served me well.

What do you treasure most on earth?

My freedom.  I lost it for a while, and I missed it terribly.  I have no plans to let it out of my sight again.

What did you like to do as a child?  Favorite games, pastimes, friends, etc.

I was one of those tree climbers.  Not your ordinary tree climber, I was that kid who would climb to the top of a fifty foot pine tree and cling to the very top, swaying in the breeze, and survey the landscape.  That was my first taste of real freedom, and set me on the path of daredevil mayhem.

What is the single-most important thing that has happened to you thus-far on your writing journey?

Getting a contract from Inknbeans Press to publish my work.  I’m out of my realm in the writing business, and it’s nice to have someone at my side, finally.

How important is being successful as a writer to you?

It’s become the single most important thing to my future.  As an unemployed construction worker, I have no desire to go back to it.  My body getting tired, as well as damaged.  I hope to continue this for the rest of my days.

The genie is going to grant you three wishes.  What are they?

Peace, love, and happiness.  Anything else that I could ask for would only bring me to these conclusions anyway.

You get one day to spend any way you want with whomever you want. Describe the day (money is no object)

I want to take my mother out for a boat ride on Lake Mead.  I’ve done it a thousand times, and never had the chance to take her out there.  She lives in the upper peninsula of Michigan, and doesn’t get out much.  I’ve had some really great times on that lake.  We’d start the day off at nine in the morning, and depart from the southern part of Boulder Basin.  Lake Mead Marina is filled with beautiful boats of all kinds.  Speedboats, sailboats and yachts are lined up like toys in a pond.  Then it’s off to Sandy cove, where I can light the bbq and have a dandy lunch.  A relaxing day spent cruising on the water is just what my mother needs.  At seventy-four years old, she never seems to have enough time to just enjoy herself.  When the day is done, I’ll tie the boat up in the slip and we can have a cocktail in the Captain’s lounge.  That would be a great day.

Who or what were your main inspirations for choosing a writing career?

I’ve always enjoyed telling stories.  It’s the highlight of my night, whoever I’m hanging out with.  I’ve had a lot of friends over the years tell me “You need to write a book!”  Well, I finally did.  If the economy hadn’t crashed when it did, I probably would never had done it.  I never had the time before.  When things were good, I worked 80 hrs a day, and then some.  Time was a commodity that I never had.  Now, I have far too much!  Oh well, better finish the next one, before time runs out.

Thank you, JT for being my guest this week.  Readers, be sure to leave a comment to show JT you have enjoyed his featured spot.  And, if you’d like to find out more about author J.T. Sather check out the links below.  The Book Junkies page includes many pictures, including those of his sand sculptures.

http://www.bookjunkiesjournal.com/jt-sather.html

howtosurvivehttp://www.amazon.com/Survive-When-Bottom-Drops-Volume/dp/1479152250/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1364329421&sr=8-1&keywords=jt+sather

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/286380

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Introducing Author LA Jones

Posted on March 11, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews, L.Leander Book Reviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

lajones_1I love Mondays because I get to meet some intriguing authors each week.  This week my guest is LA Jones, author of Tales of Aradia The Last Witch.  You can read my review of the book here.  Be sure to leave a comment below for a chance to win an autographed copy of the book!

Interview with LA Jones

by L.Leander

What is your favorite pastime (other than writing)? (you can only pick one) and why?

Shopping. I love shopping. Going out and checking the new imaginative styles. Hanging out at the book stores and talking with the clerks. It’s my favorite pastime.

Who are you as a writer?

In all honesty, I am a person who has ASD (autism spectrum disorder) who is trying to become a role model and inspiration to people who also have this disorder.

What are your thoughts on the Indie Publishing movement?

My thought is like many new movements it takes to time to flower or flourish. I am actually happy about the indie author movement because it puts more power in to the author’s hands. Too long has the publisher held power in the relationship between writer and publisher. Publisher and their clients (writers) should be partners. This indie author movement is making sure of that.

Have you ever ghostwritten?  Would you?  Why?

No. I just wouldn’t feel comfortable with using someone else’s identity and idea to write a book.

What is your favorite book of all time?  Why? 

Matilda by Roald Dahl because the story of a little girl over coming such impossible odds has always been so inspiring.

Do you believe writers need a degree to be successful?  Why or why not? No. I believe degrees don’t guarantee or signify anything. In the end determination is what gets things done. I have always been a believer of self-education. What you learn on your own time is what you use in your life.  

You are camping in a tent in the woods.  A loud roar happens outside the flap to the tent.  What do you do?

I stay very still and try not to irritate whatever the hell it is that made that noise. I also try to hide a weapon under my pillow just in case.

What is your greatest asset?  Why?

My creativity and my ability to be so open-minded. I welcome criticism and suggestions because they help me to be a better writer. My creativity because it helps me think of new things to write and develop.

What do you treasure most on earth? My family and my friends.

What did you like to do as a child?  Favorite games, pasttimes, friends, etc. I like to make up games and watch TV. Most of all, I loved to read.

What is the single-most important thing that has happened to you thus-far on your writing journey?

I think what has helped me most of all was meeting my editor Harrison R. Bradlow. He has helped my series reach its true potential and opened my eyes to all sorts of possibilities.

How important is being successful as a writer to you? Very. I want to be able to live off my writing and help entertain people with my stories. In addition to inspiring others.

The genie is going to grant you three wishes.  What are they?

One) my book series to become the next big franchise. Two) to be able to live off my writing. Three) to be able to become the next J.K. Rowling. Meaning an inspiration to my fellow authors and such.

You get one day to spend any way you want with whomever you want.  Describe the day (money is no object)

Meeting some of the authors who helped inspire me to reach my potential. Namely, buying plane tickets to visit RJ Palmer and her husband and taking her family out to Disneyland or something. Traveling to Florida to meet L.A. Sherman another author who has inspired me. Most of all, traveling to Las Vegas and taking my editor and his family to Disney World.

Who or what were your main inspirations for choosing a writing career?

My family mostly. They have always loved the fact that I am an author and are very proud of me for being able to publish my books. I don’t think I would have gotten this far without their help.

Editor and partner in my series: Harrison R. Bradlow.la_1

http://www.harrisonbradlow.com/index.html

Readers: Thanks for coming and don’t forget to leave a comment in the comments section for a chance to win an autographed copy of the first book in the series.  Winner will be notified on Monday, March 18.

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Introducing Author Michael Cavallo

Posted on February 18, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWell, everyone.  You won’t want to miss this week’s zany interview with author Michael Cavallo, the author of Michael Did What?  You can read my review of the book here.  Mike is a funny guy and the great lengths his character goes to to prove to the world how wonderful he is makes for a light read.  I found myself laughing more than once.  You will too. (Be sure to check out the links at the end of the interview – Michael has a money-saving coupon for you!

Interview with Michael Cavallo

by L.Leander

What is your favorite pastime (other than writing)? (you can only pick one) and why?

I don’t really have one. Life just kinda gets in the way. I’m married, with two kids, a house, and that keeps be busy. Aside from writing and marketing, “Michael Did What?” I’ve been mentally kicking around a few ideas for my next book. For now, “Michael Did What?” takes most of my free time. That, and trying to keep those little cups on top of the NyQuil bottles. They’re always disappearing, and it’s up to me to restore order to the medicine cabinet. Can you consider that a pastime?

Who are you as a writer?

Simply put, I’m really just going for a laugh, and there are few rules to that. (One is to refer to bad 80’s TV shows a lot. What the heck was Hart to Hart about anyway?)  I’m trying to keep the reader a little off balance so they never really know what to expect. I like to use a variety of techniques, each in a different way, and without a discernible pattern. I like to hit the reader with a joke about F. Murray Abraham and two stalks of celery when they least expect it.

What are your thoughts on the Indie Publishing movement?

As a writer, I think it’s awesome. It gives every author an opportunity, which is all one can ask for. It’s also a ton of work, and full of scams. (The Ultra-Golden-Ruby-Premium Marketing package will help you to sell 3 million books in the first 3 days alone! By Thursday, Lindsay Lohan will be cast in the movie version, provided she posts bail! Just send $400 now, and an address where your groupies should loiter!)

I’m self-published on Amazon, so I’m more familiar with that than the others, but I did do my homework. It takes so much time and effort to get your book noticed, but if it’s good, it will be shared, and you’re on your way. Competition is tremendous, as even the most popular writers give their books away for free or 99 cents from time to time. It can be rewarding though, once you invest the time and effort into learning how to utilize the industry, and filter out the nonsense.

As a reader, it can be just as much work separating the good writing from the not so good. You can find some good work in whatever niche you’re into, and you may have to sift through a lot of titles. I’m not sure the world needs a 450 page tome dedicated to the proper storage of garden hoses, (and 67 ways to coil them!) but at least the choice is there. Worst case scenario, you’ve wasted a dollar.

Have you ever ghostwritten?  Would you?  Why?

It isn’t something that I’ve really considered, but I would love to do it. I think I’d have a great ability to help someone crystallize their thoughts, and inject some humor into their story. I understand Fidel Castro’s English isn’t so good, and, let’s face it, he isn’t known for his humor. I could help to soften his image in his golden years. This could be a win-win for both of us! Do his henchmen read this blog? Maybe then I’ll have henchmen too. That’s when you know you’ve made it.

What is your favorite book of all time?  Why?Little.Happy.Michael

I’m not sure I have an all-time favorite book. If I had to pick one, Our Dumb World from the Onion would probably be it. Who satirizes an atlas, anyway? Brilliant! Probably a million one-liners in that book. Also America, the Book, by John Stewart. Great sound bites, blurbs, ridiculous comments in a spoofed textbook. A textbook I can scribble in if I want to! I guess I see these as revenge from years of Catholic grammar school.

Do you believe writers need a degree to be successful?  Why or why not?

Of course not. A writer only needs a bunch of crap bouncing around inside of his head, a need to get it out, and the means to do so. See those people wandering around Manhattan muttering to themselves, oblivious to the world around them? Those are unwritten books, trying to get out.

You are camping in a tent in the woods.  A loud roar happens outside the flap to the tent.  What do you do?

First, I unzip the flap as patiently and gingerly as possible, sometimes taking upwards of six hours, so as not to draw undue attention upon myself. If the roaring still persists, I will then attempt to distract the roarmaker, usually by screaming like a little bitch. I do this as I make a bee-line for the cooler, and bravely attempt to liberate as many cans of beer as possible, while cursing myself for not finishing them the night before. I will then head towards the car, which, because of the Rules of Scary Movies, is wwwwaaaaaayyy off in the opposite direction. Immediately thereafter, I drop one of the cans, and am faced with a dilemma: Continue on, and enjoy the juice of my labor in the comfort of my ’72 Pinto? Or do I risk it all to go back for the lone ale, reminding myself that people are sober in China? Being as eco-conscious as I am, I make an about face to rescue the lone straggler. This is when, as the Rules of Scary Movies dictate, that the hideous beast emerges from the brush, and the race—full of close-ups, and in slow motion—begins for real. Realizing that if something works, you should stick with it, I then enter Phase II of my plan, namely, screaming like a BIG banshee. The higher pitch and frequency of this brilliant and manly plan usually works to perfection, and within moments I’m sipping a cold one from inside my car, while the defeated monster fogs my window with his rapid panting. All that’s left to do, as the camera pans back, is give that squirrel the finger. Fade to black, roll credits.*

*No squirrels were hurt during the answering of this question.

What is your greatest asset?  Why?

That’s easy. My sense of humor. I’ve learned to find the humor in almost any situation, including the most difficult ones. That’s not to say you can avoid your responsibilities, or neglect to do the tough things that need to be done, but I always try to find a way to laugh while doing them. Many people may feel that you can’t be serious about something and maintain a sense of humor about it at the same time. They feel it’s either/or. I’ve laughed in the dentist’s chair, emergency room, and funeral homes. If I can help other people to laugh while in those situations, that’s even better.

What do you treasure most on earth?

That’s a bit tougher. I’d have to say life itself. The process of life, of growing and evolving. Just watching life unfold, and taking from it what you can, and being thankful for it. Most people can look back on difficult times and see how it made them grow, and then appreciate it. If  I can accelerate that process, and experience gratitude during the difficult times, then I’ve taken a tremendous step. I have done that. The trick is to do it consistently. That, and pepper-jack cheese. The mild cheese is deliciously offset by the spiciness of the jalapenos. It’s like there’s a party in my mouth.

What did you like to do as a child?  Favorite games, pastimes, friends, etc.

I played hockey a lot, usually as a goalie. There’s was nothing like it. When I’m focused, nothing else exists except that puck. I wouldn’t feel cold, or tired, or worry my car insurance is due. Time would sometime slow down, and I’d see the play a few seconds before it unfolded. Other times, it would speed up, and I’d have no recollection of plays after the game. The outside world would just cease to exist.

What is the single-most important thing that has happened to you thus-far on your writing journey?

I’d have to say the confidence I’ve gained, just learning to open up a bit, and put myself out there. You immediately set yourself up for criticism, and need to understand it comes with the territory. And this is just from a simple joke book, it’s not like I’ve published my personal memoirs. Of course, the positive feedback  helps too.

How important is being successful as a writer to you?

I enjoy making people laugh, so that is my primarily goal. If I can do that, and  make a few bucks, even better. What I don’t enjoy is the constant work promoting, and marketing the book. In a perfect world, I’d have an army of minions to take care of that.

The genie is going to grant you three wishes.  What are they?

Well, the most obvious answer is for world peace, but I don’t want to sound like a desperate Miss America contestant.  Another would be for my kids to get along, but this would not be possible without supernatural intervention. They could rule the entire Earth, and they’d still fight. Stuff like:

One son: “This is MY ocean! Why don’t you go play in the Atlantic?!?”

Other son: “But I saw it first! I want to play here!”

Either son: “Moooommm!”

The other two wishes? I don’t know. Can I donate them to charity?

You get one day to spend any way you want with whomever you want.  Describe the day (money is no object)

Money is no object? What about resurrecting the dead? If that isn’t an object, then I’d go drinking with Jim Morrison. I would describe the day in great detail, but unfortunately I’d have no recollection of it. Trust me, we had a good time.

Who or what were your main inspirations for choosing a writing career?

I’d have to say Douglas Adams, and Dave Barry. Dave Barry could write an article about any topic, and take it in any direction within 3 paragraphs. No matter where he went with it, it was hilarious. Adams too, but he’d build a full novel around it. I also have a tiny (3 inch square, hardcover) book on my desk about the New York Mets. I don’t know the title, but it’s the crappiest book I have ever come across. About 30 pages, with one ‘fact’ on each page. The thing is, the facts aren’t even impressive. Stuff like, “Mike Piazza hit 2 doubles against L.A. on August 9, 2001.” From a major publisher, with a price of $7.99. An average fan could do better right of the top of their head. I’m not sure where I got it, but keep it as inspiration. If this book can be published and sold, I can challenge the Bible.

Readers, I hope you’ve enjoyed this interview as much as I have.  Please leave Michael a comment to let him know you stopped by!  If you’d like to find out more about Michael Cavallo (who wouldn’t?) check out his links below:

Michael.Did.What.eBook.03Amazon:
CreateSpace (Paperback) https://www.createspace.com/3991243
(Coupon for this paperback at CreateSpace, $1.00 off with code C75DXRC3)
Page a Day Calendar from Printed Owl:
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Introducing Author Kate Benzin

Posted on February 4, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews, L.Leander Reviews and Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Kate 2011 10I am very pleased to introduce you to Kate Benzin this week.  She’s an adventuress who shares her travel escapades with readers through her work.  I met Kate on a Facebook group and we became instant online friends.  If you haven’t read her books you’ve got to do it – you’ll be amazed, entertained and enlightened as you follow her on her journeys to different countries and cultures.  Now, so I don’t let the cat out of the bag, I’ll go on with my interview of Kate.  If you’d like to read my review of Kate’s book Transformative Travel In Nepal, you can check it out here.

Interview of Author, Kate Benzin

by L.Leander

What is your favorite pastime (other than writing)? (you can only pick one) and why?

Travel is my favorite pastime other than writing. Of course, this is a bit of a cheat because I use my travels as the basis for some of my books. For example, my book TRANSFORMATIVE TRAVEL IN NEPAL: FULFILLING A DREAM IN THE HIMALAYAS is the true story of my trekking experience in the Nepal Himalayas. I kept a very detailed journal every day and then used my journal to re-construct my experience. It’s written in a fiction style, but it’s definitely a true story.

I have another book in the works called TRANS-SIBERIA EXPRESS TRAIN: MOWCOW TO MONGOLIA – also about my travel experience on that iconic train ride. It’ll be a while before I publish that – just have too many books in the works.

Who are you as a writer?

I am a writer who like to delve into the emotions of how people react or why they act in certain ways. For me, plot is second to the emotional life of the characters.

What are your thoughts on the Indie Publishing movement?

The Indie Publishing movement is absolutely great. I’ve always written, but would have never bothered to actually publish a book without this movement.

Have you ever ghostwritten?  Would you?  Why?

I have not ghostwritten, but have actually considered it. I’m collaborating with a friend on a book that is a lot of rambling of a person who was sliding further and further into depression, paranoia, schizophrenia. If she had not been willing to have me as a co-author, I would have ghostwritten because I think her journey into that dark place and then back to recovery is very important and needs to be shared.

I doubt that I would do any ghostwriting for the money simply because I’ve got too much on my plate as it is. I have no objections to ghostwriting on principle – I guess if I ever ran out of my own stuff, then I’d do that.

What is your favorite book of all time?  Why? 

Do I have to pick just one??? Here are 3 – Crime & Punishment, Steppenwolf, Brothers Karamazov

Do you believe writers need a degree to be successful?  Why or why not?

A degree??? What’s that???

No, seriously, people need to have experiences in order to be successful. In my jaded opinion, a degree only shows that you had the discipline to do what needed to be done in order to get that piece of paper. Well, maybe it’s not the only thing that it shows, but it certainly is not a requirement for success. To be successful, a person needs to look inside, examine what he/she finds there, and figure out what to do with what is inside.

You are camping in a tent in the woods.  A loud roar happens outside the flap to the tent.  What do you do?

I run out to see what it is. And hopefully, I have my camera with me to get a photo.

What is your greatest asset?  Why?

My greatest asset – that implies that I have more than one! I guess I would say adaptability. It happens to be foremost in my mind right now because it was a very needed asset in something that I lived through a couple of years ago which is the topic of my next book – FIRE & DEATH: LIVING IN THE SHADOW OF JAVA’S MOST ACTIVE VOLCANO. This is another true story about my experience when the volcano that I live on erupted and I had to evacuate my home with my dogs. As I wrote this book, I certainly saw how my ability to adapt was so important.

What do you treasure most on earth?

My dogs – they are my loves.

What did you like to do as a child?  Favorite games, pasttimes, friends, etc.

Well, of course, I liked to read. I can remember not playing after school with friends because I wanted to go home and read. Is that crazy or what?

What is the single-most important thing that has happened to you thus-far on your writing journey?

I guess that the most important thing is that I am constantly learning how to see the world differently. If I’m in the process of writing, then I’m looking at everything through the eyes of who I was then in the case of a memoir and how much I learned or experienced  and seeing how that has affected me. If I’m writing fiction, then I’m looking at things through that person’s eyes and seeing a different point of view.

It reminds me of when I first started painting – I never looked at anything the same way again. I saw colors more vividly – I saw shapes and colors that I’d never seen before. Writing does the same thing for me, but in a different way.

How important is being successful as a writer to you?

Well, as far as I’m concerned, just having strangers buy something that I put my heart and soul into – and then reading it – this is success to me, and I guess that’s pretty important. I like selling more copies, but that isn’t the most important part. Getting emails from readers who were touched by what I wrote – that is success – and yes, it’s important.

The genie is going to grant you three wishes.  What are they?

My first 2 wishes are the time and money to build a house on the property that I bought a few years ago very close to where I’m living now. Then the 3rd wish would be for me and my dogs to live out our days in that home. But I have to say that if I never build that house, I’ve already got a little piece of paradise where I’m living with my doggies already.

You get one day to spend any way you want with whomever you want.  Describe the day (money is no object)

I hate to be terribly boring, but I’m already living the life that I dreamed of when I was younger. Later on, I’ll probably be sorry that I didn’t choose some place and someone really cool. I guess the only thing that I’d love would be if I could have a day 50 years from now to see what kind of technology has developed.

Who or what were your main inspirations for choosing a writing career?

I can’t say that I had any actual inspirations. I always wrote as therapy for myself. I went through some very difficult times emotionally and writing was what got me through those times. And little by little, writing came to mean more and more to me.

Thank you for being my guest this week, Kate.  Readers, leave Kate a comment to let her know you enjoyed our chat.  And be sure to check out her books (scroll to the bottom to see the cover of her soon-to-be-released book, Fire and Death.

TransTravTransformative Travel in Nepal: A Himalayan Journey by Kate Benzin

Kate Benzin’s Websites:

http://katebenzin.com

http://traveling-forever.com

Kate’s Facebook page: facebook.com/kategypsy

Kate’s Email: kate@katebenzin.com

Kate Benzin Bio:

Kate Benzin is a seasoned traveler and tour director who has lived in Indonesia for most of the past 30 years. Indonesia became her home when she took a 3-month work assignment to train Indonesians on word processing equipment, and she fell in love with the adventurous lifestyle that living in Indonesia gave her. After working as a tour director in many countries of the world for the past 15years, she now spends most of her time writing in her home/office which she shares with her three Dalmatians.

Other books by Kate Benzin:

CoverHow to Find the Heart of Bali

FD 6 smallComing soon!!! Fire and Death: Living in the Shadow of Java’s Most Active Volcano

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Introducing Author J.T. Schaad

Posted on January 7, 2013. Filed under: Author Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

222743_10150558942720075_746485074_18225713_4275797_nThis week I am pleased to introduce a chilling writer, J.T. Schaad.  J.T.s books are not for the faint-hearted.  He writes in the style of Thomas Harris (whose work I absolutely love) and the scenes are graphic and scary.  I could not put down Black Rose from the moment I picked it up. You can read my review here.  I warn you, if you choose to read the book, it’ll leave a mark on you.  Evil can lurk anywhere – maybe even closer than you think?  On a lighter note, J.T. and I have something in common – we are both musicians and songwriters.  It’s always nice to connect with someone who is into the same things you are.

J.T. Schaad Interview

By L.Leander

Where do you write?  What’s your creative space like?

I write in my office at home most of the time. In the office I have my desktop pc (I don’t do laptops, keep feeling like It’s gonna break lol) and it is also my music room. I”ve got my guitars, my bass guitars, amps and so forth. It’s my own little world in there.

What is your favorite writing tool?

For drafts I strongly prefer my pc, because I type fast and can usually keep up with my brain when I’m in hyperdrive plowing through a story. For outlines I use spiral notebook paper. For song lyrics I use yellow legal pads.

What movie star would you pick as one of the characters in your book and why?

I think that Ed O’Neill from the early 90’s would be perfect as Frank Adams. He just has that sort of realism to him. Always been a big fan of his since I was a kid.

What did you want to be when you grew up?  Did you realize that dream?

I’ve always wanted to be a writer and a musician. I realized my dream of writing when I was 9 years old. I had a story idea that came to mind out of the blue. I searched and searched to find this idea in a book so I could read it. Finally I just decided to do it on my own. I became hooked on it. I always say that beyond being an artist, I am a fan first. I write mostly so I can read the story. When I get an idea it’s like seeing a preview at the movies for something that looks awesome. I get an idea that grabs me and I realize I have to read this book. But I have to write it first lol

Explain your creative process.  Pantser?  Outliner? 

For my novels I start with an outline. I find it way easier to use an outline when you are tackling something as big as a novel. I outline the entire story chapter by chapter. Then when I write the prose I just have to fill in the blanks basically. If I didn’t do this I would go nuts because I would do nothing but rewrites. Nothing more frustrating then getting a great idea of where the story should go, but realizing that for this to happen you have to rewrite the past 100 pages.

If you could only have one mode of transportation what would it be, a horse or a bicycle?  Why?

I like bicycles. They are fun to ride and they almost become a part of your body. Plus you are in control. With a horse, you never have full control.

Do you dream about your stories?  Ever written about a dream?

I don’t dream about them. At least I don’t think I do. I say that because my dreams never make any logical sense after I wake up.

What were you like in high school?  Class clown?  Nerd?  Cheerleader type?

In high school I was kind of a loner. I always felt more comfortable with my fictional characters then the real world. I hid in the back of the room and read. Then I went home and played guitar and wrote. That was high school for me.

What’s your favorite theme park?  Why?  (If you’ve never been, which one would you like to visit and why?)

I’ve never had a chance to go to one. It would have to be one with a horror theme. That would be like a huge crazy haunted house type of thing. I think that would be wicked sweet.

Are you a reader?  What types of books do you like best?  What author(s)?

I love reading. Always have since I was 5. I read a variety, but horror/thrillers have always been my faves. I’ve always been a huge fan of Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Jack Ketchum, Richard Laymon, R L Stine, Poe,  James Patterson, right now I  love the Dexter novels by Jeff  Lindsay. Those are awesome.

Thank you, J.T. for being my guest this week.  Readers, you can connect with J.T. and his works at the links listed below.  How about leaving him a comment here to let him know you read his interview and support him?  Thanks for stopping by!

Here’s a little more information from J.T. regarding his current works in progress. 

I am currently working on a vampire series. The first book is entitled Blood Born. It should be finished soon.

I currently am working on a werewolf series, and a few paranormal series. One will focus on a town and the strange inhabitants and history. One series will focus on a paranormal investigative team.

So I have many many ideas running around in my head.

I also have many short stories I am working on also. These are great to relax with between novels.

J.T. Schaad Author Bio

I’ve been writing since I was 9 years old and I still feel as passionate about it today as I did then. It is an amazing feeling when you find something like this that you truly love. I’ve been lucky to find several passions in the arts. In addition to writing, I am a musician, songwriter, and a budding film maker.

I’m the author of the Black Rose series and The Blood Born series (coming soon)

Black Rose Cover 1440X2250 (2)CONTACT

http://www.jtschaad.com

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6571673.J_T_Schaad

https://twitter.com/wordsmithjts

http://www.facebook.com/feareternal?ref=hl

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Black-Rose/116396145196655?ref=hl#!/pages/Black-Rose/116396145196655

GET BLACK ROSE HERE!

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267550

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INTRODUCING AUTHOR AMY METZ

Posted on November 26, 2012. Filed under: Author Interviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

It is my pleasure to introduce you to author Amy Metz in this week’s interview.  Amy is a charming person and excellent writer who delights her readers with euphemisms of southern wit.  I thoroughly enjoyed her book Murder and Mayhem in Goose Pimple Junction and you can read my review here.  Amy also does reviews and interviews, so when you’re done reading about her here go on over and visit her website – it’s well done and very interesting!

Interview with Amy Metz

by L.Leander

1.  What makes you stand out as a writer?

Goose Pimple Junction is a wacky town with quirky residents. I think those unique qualities and the goosepimpleisms throughout the book make Murder & Mayhem In Goose Pimple Junction different from your average mystery.

2.  What is your favorite type of reading material?

Anything with a mystery, humor, or love story.  Combine all three and I’m there. I love mysteries, and I particularly love humorous mysteries. I also love romantic suspense or romantic mysteries.

3.  If you could only pick one, who is your greatest influence?

Yikes! I honestly have no idea!

4.  Where do you get your ideas for writing?

Everywhere. I’m always on the lookout for ideas, and sometimes reading, hearing, or seeing something sparks a new story. My imaginary friends also frequently give me ideas.

5.  Are you a pantser or an outliner?

Both, depending on the story.

6.  Finish this sentence:  One thing very few people know about me is…

I have fibromyalgia. It’s similar to chronic fatigue syndrome, and I have flares when I do too much or don’t get enough sleep. It’s another reason why writing is the ideal occupation for me.

7.  If I had a choice, every day would include:

Oh, so many things. The ocean. Cheesecake. Books. How about eating cheesecake on a beach, reading a book? But seriously, I’d have to say every day would include love.

8.  If you were stranded on a deserted island and could have Internet and a computer or a supply of paper and pens, which would you choose?

Definitely the Internet and a computer. I would go into severe withdrawal without them.

9.  Do you hear voices?  What do they tell you?  What do you tell them?

Not really voices, but I do feel like I get strong suggestions about what to write from my characters. I tell them to have their way with me. I’m easy. But only with imaginary people.

10. What is your very favorite part of being an author?  Your least favorite?

I love to get lost in my story and spend time with my characters. I hate promoting and marketing.

11. Where did you grow up?

Louisville, Kentucky.  I moved away for college and lived in Lexington for a few years after that, but mostly, Louisville has been home.

12. Describe your ideal vacation (the sky’s the limit.)

I would go to Boston and wander the streets for days, photographing that totally cool city. Then I would drive to Kennebunkport and stay at The Colony Hotel, where I would walk on the beach, take more pictures, and I’d sit on the veranda overlooking the beach and read a good book. Then, because the sky’s the limit, I would go to Ireland, Scotland, and England. And take lots of pictures.

13.  If you could be either, which would you choose – a dog or a cat?  Why?

Definitely a dog.  To me, dogs are goofier, more loving, generally have a warmer, friendlier personality, and they’re more affectionate than most cats. Now, cat people, don’t yell at me. I know there are exceptions. But I would be a dog. I’d be a lab or a golden retriever or a mastiff.

14. You are the co-host of CBS This Morning – who would you like to snag an interview with?

John Sandford. In fact, John—if you’re reading this, call me. I’d love to feature you on my blog!

15.  Tell us a little about your most recent protagonist?

Tess Tremaine is a forty-something Yankee who moved to the southern town of Goose Pimple Junction to start a new chapter in her life after getting a divorce. Because of her unhappy marriage and contentious divorce, she’s sworn off men. Until she meets Jackson Wright. As much as she tries to deny an attraction, she’s smitten. And as much as she tries to avoid him, he keeps popping up. They team up to investigate a seventy-five-year-old cold case murder, and he becomes her translator for southern speak and her saving grace in more ways than one.

Thank you for being here, Amy, and sharing a little bit about yourself.  Readers, check out the links below to buy Murder and Mayhem in Goose Pimple Junction and visit Amy’s site where there are lots of featured Indie authors.  Leave a comment in the comments section below to give Amy some love.  Thanks!

Other places to find Amy Metz (click on the book cover to go to her Amazon book listing):

Amy Metz website

Amy Metz Blog

Amy Metz Amazon Author Page

Amy Metz Facebook Page

 

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